AWAKENING FOR ALL!!! EL ARE EVERYWHERE!!! "The EL Apocalypse"

Friday, July 1, 2016

The lost mystery city of Kephises in the Brazilian State of Bahia

   The historical account of the Manuscript 512

   Historical account of a large, hidden and very ancient city, without inhabitants, that was discovered in the year 1753 by the Bandeiristas, 
a group of Portuguese adventurers.
   Extracted from the “Revista Trimestral” of the Instituto Historico e Geografico Brasileiro in Rio de Janeiro, Tomo I, 1839, pgs. 179/189.
   This document has emerged the interest and the curiosity of many explorers and adventurers who looked repeatedly for its contents starting from a period of more than two centuries ago. The Manuscript 512 was also the document that raised the interest of Colonel Percy Harrison Fawcett, who devoted his life in finding the lost city of ‘Z’ mentioned in the document offering his own life and the lives of his eldest son and a young fellow who followed him in this eighth ill-fated expedition into an unknown and unexplored territory of the Brazilian wilderness of Mato Grosso state.
   This is a very important work that has been done by  Francisco Lago, a respectful Brazilian researcher, writer, teacher and lawyer; a work that revealed an incredible result of his research on document 512 in connection with Percy Harrison Fawcett.
   The entire documentation is included in our website in Portuguese, its original language. However, there is also an English translation of the manuscript 512 in “The Great Web of Percy Harrison Fawcett”.
   Was it the right document and why Colonel Fawcett relied on it?
   The following is another translation from Portuguese to English in 1861 by Mrs. Richard Burton or Miss Isabel Arundell (that was her name before she joined with Captain Richard Francis Burton, Founder’s Medallist of the Royal Geographical Society in 1859), who begs indulgence, on account of this report that has been written in old Portuguese by rude explorers and soldiers of fortune, and therefore it was very difficult to render it into English.
   The missing lines that are not filled in, were illegible from the age and decayed state of the original Manuscript. This translation was introduced as a supplement in the book The Highlands of Brazil, of Richard F. Burton in 1869. It is also important to be informed that Mrs. Burton never had that manuscript in her own hands as Colonel Percy Harrison Fawcett did many times in Biblioteca Nacional do Rio de Janeiro.
   In America in the interior adjoining the Master of Can and his followers, having wandered over the desert country (Sertoes) for ten years in the hopes of discovering the far-famed silver mines of the great explorer Moribeca, which through the fault of a certain governor were not made public, and to deprive him of this glory he was imprisoned in Bahia till death, and they remained again to be discovered. This news reached Rio de Janeiro in the beginning of the year 1754.
   After a long and troublesome peregrination, incited by the insatiable greed of gold, and almost lost for many years in this vast Desert, we discovered a chain of mountains so high that they seemed to reach the ethereal regions, and that they served as a throne for the wind or for the stars themselves. The glittering thereof struck the beholder from afar, chiefly when the sun shone upon the crystal of which it was composed, forming a sight so grand and so agreeable that none could take eyes off these shining lights. Rain had set in before we had time to enter (in the itinerary) this crystalline marvel, and we saw the water running over the bare stone and precipitating itself from the high rocks when it appeared to us like snow struck by the solar rays. The agreeable prospect of this  shine of the waters and the tranquility  of the weather, we resolved to investigate this admirable prodigy of nature. Arriving at the foot of the ascent without any hindrance from forests or rivers, which might have bared our passage, but making a detour round the mountains, we did not find a free pass to carry out our resolution to ascend these Alps and Brazilian Pyrenees, and we experienced an inexplicable sadness from this mistake.
We ‘ranched’ ourselves with the design of retracing our steps the following day. A Negro, however, going to fetch wood, happened to start a white stag which he saw, and by this chance discovered a road between two mountain chains, which seemed cut asunder by art rather than by nature. With the over joy of this news we began to ascend, which consisted of loose stones piled up, whence we thought it had once been a paved road broken up by the injuries of time. The ascent occupied three good hours, pleasantly, on account of the crystals, at which we wondered. We halted at the top of the mountain, which commanded an extensive view, and we saw upon a level plain new motives to rouse our admiration.
We discerned about a league and a half from us a large settlement, whose extent convinced us that it must be some city dependent upon the capital of the Brazil. We descended soon to the valley, with the precaution it might be in such a case, sending  explor gate the quality and that they should take good notice chimneys, this being one of the evident sings of settlements.
We waited for the explorers during two days, lodging for news, and only waited to hear cocks crow to be certain that it was peopled. At last our men returned, undeceived as regards there being any inhabitants, which puzzled us greatly. An Indian of our company then resolved at all risks, but with precaution, to enter; but he returned much frightened, affirming that he did not find nor could he discover the trail of any human being. This we would not believe, because we had seen the houses, and thus all the explorers took heart to follow the Indian’s track.
They returned, confirming the above-mentioned deposition, namely, that there were not inhabitants, and so we determined all to enter this settlement well armed and at dawn, which we did without meeting any one to hinder our way, and without finding any other road save that which led directly to the great settlement. Its entrance is through three arches of great height, and the middle one is the largest, whilst the two side arches are less. Upon the largest and principal we discerned letters, which from their great height could not be copied.
There was one street the breadth of the three arches, with upper storied houses on either side; the fronts of carved stone already blackened; so ……………………………………………………………………………………………… inscriptions all open ……………………………………………………………… (d)oors are low of ma(ke) …………. ……………………………… nas noting that by the regularity and symmetry with which they are constructed it appeared to be one long house, being in reality a great many. Some had open terraces, and all without tiles, the roofs being some of burnt bricks and others of freestone slabs.
We went through some of the houses with great fear, and nowhere could we find a vestige of personal goods or furniture, which might by their use or fabric throw any light on the nature of the inhabitants. The houses are all dark in the interior; there was scarcely a gleam of light; and as they are vaulted, the voices of those who spoke re-echoed till our own accents frightened us.
Having examined and passed through the long street, we came to a regular square, and in the middle of it was a column of black stone of extraordinary height and size, and upon it was the statue of an average-sized man, with one hand upon his left haunch, and the right arm extended, pointing with his forefinger to the North Pole. In each corner of the said square was a needle (obelisk?), in imitation of that used by the Romans, but some had suffered ill usage and were broken, as if struck by thunder-bolds.
On the other hand of this square was a superb edifice, as it were the principal house of some Lord of the land. There was an enormous saloon in the entrance, and still from fear we did not investigate all the hou(ses) ……………………………………………… being numerous and the retret …………….. ………………… ……………………………………………………………………………..………… zerao to form …….. some …………………………………………………………………….. ………………………………………………………………………………. mara we found o(ne) ….. ………..………………………………………………. mass of extraordinary ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………    (per)sons had difficulty in raising it. The bats were so many that they attacked the people’s faces, and made such a noise that it astonished them. Upon the principal portico of this street was a figure in demi-relief carved out of the same stone, and stripped from the waist upwards, crowned with laurels. It represented a young figure, and beardless. Beneath the shield of the figure were some characters, spoiled by time. However, we made out the following. (See the Plate, inscription No. 1. below).
On the left side of the said square is another edifice, quite ruined; but from the vestiges remaining, there is no doubt that it was once a temple, for part of its magnificent frontispiece still appears, and some naves and aisles of solid stone. It occupies a large space of ground, and on its ruined walls are seen carvings of superior workmanship, with some figures and pictures inlaid in the stone, with crosses and different emblems, crows and other minutiae, which would take a long time to describe.
Follow this edifice — large portions of the city totally ruined and buried in large and frightful openings of the earth, and all this ground not a blade of grass, tree, or plant was produced by nature, but only heaps of stone and some coarse rough works, by which we judged ………………………………….. vercao, because still amongst ………………………da of corpses which …….. ……………………….. …………………………………………….. is part of this unhappy ………….. da, and …….. forsaken perhaps on account of some earthquake.
In front of the said square runs rapidly a mighty and broad river, which had spacious banks and was agreeable to the sight. It might be from 11 to 12 fathoms broad, without considering turnings, and its banks were free from trees and timber, which the inundations usually bring down. We sounded its depth and found in its deepest parts from 13 to 16 fathoms. On the further side of it are most flourishing plains, and  with such a variety of flowers that it would appear as if nature was more bountiful to these parts, making them produce a perfect garden of Flora. We admired also some lagoons full of rise, of which we profited, and likewise innumerable flocks of ducks which breed in these fertile plains, and we found no difficulty in killing them without shot, but caught them in our hands.

We marched for three days down the river, and came upon a cataract, which made a fearful noise from the force of the water and the obstacles in its bed, so that we thought the mouths of the far-famed Nile could not make more. Below this fall the river so spreads out that it appears to be the great ocean. It is full of peninsulas covered with green turf, with a sprinkling of trees, which make …………. darel. Here we found ………………………………….. ……………………………………………………………… in default of it if we ……………… ………………………….  (mu)ch variety of game ………………………. (o)ther many animals bred; there being no huntsmen to chase and persecute them.
To the east of this waterfall we found several deep cuttings and frightful excavations, and tried its depth with many ropes, which, no matter how long they were, could not touch its bottom. We found also some loose stones, and, on the surface of the land some silver nails, as if they were drawn from mines and left at the moment.
Amongst these caverns we saw one covered with an enormous stone slab, and with the following figures carved on the same stone, which apparently contains some great mystery. (See the inscription No. 2. below) Upon the portico of the temple we saw others also, of the following form. (See the inscription No. 3. below)
About a cannon-shot from the village was a building as it might be of a country-house, with a front 250 paces long. The entrance was by a large portico, and we ascended a staircase of many colored stones which opened into an immense saloon, and afterwards into 15 small houses, each with a door opening into the said saloon, and each one bore its own water spout ……………………………….. a which waters, and adjoining …………. …………………………………………………………………… mao in the external courtyard ……………………………………………………………………………………………. colonnade in a cir ………………… ra squared by art, and hung with the following characters. (See the inscription No. 4. below)
After this wonder we descended to the banks of the river hoping to discover gold, and without trouble we found rich “pay-dirt” upon the surface, promising great wealth of gold as well as of Silver. We wondered at the inhabitants of this city having left such a place, not having found with all our zeal and diligence one person in these Deserts who could give any account of this deplorable marvel, as to whom this settlement might have belonged. The ruins well showed the size and grandeur, which must have been there, and how populous and opulent it had been in the age when it flourished. But now it was inhabitant by swallows, bats, rats and foxes, which fattened on the numerous breeds of chickens and ducks, and grew bigger than a pointer-dog. The rats had such sort legs they did not walk, but hopped like fleas; nor did they run like those of an inhabitant place.
From this spot a companion left us, who, with some others, after 9 days’ good march, sighted at the mouth of a large bay formed by river, a canoe carrying two white persons, with loose black hair, and dressed like Europeans, ………………………… a shot as signal, in order to ve …………………..to fly or escape …… To have ……………………………………………………… hairy and wild …… ga, and they all curl up and invest ………………………………………………..
One of our companions, called Joao Antonio, found in the ruins of a house a gold coin, round, and larger than our pieces of 6$ 400. On one side was the image or figure of a youth on his knees, and on the other side a bow, a crown and an arrow, of which sort (of money) we did not doubt there was plenty in the said settlement or deserted city, because if it had been destroyed by some earthquake, the people would not have had time suddenly to put their treasure in safety. But it would require a strong and powerful arm to examine that pile of ruins, buried for so many years, as we saw.
This intelligence I send to your Excellency from the Desert of Bahia, and from the rivers Para-oacu (Paraguassu) and Una. We have resolved not to communicate it to any person, as we think whole towns and villages would be deserted; but I impart to your Excellency tidings of the mines which we have discovered in remembrance of the much that I owe to you.
Supposing that, of our company, one has gone forth under a different understanding, I beg of your Excellency to drop these miseries, and to come and utilize these riches, and employ industry, and bribe this Indian to loose himself and conduct your Excellency to these treasures, etc. ………………………………………………………………………………… charao in the entrances …………………………………… bre stone slabs …………………………………

   The inscription above was found in the abandoned City to be seen in the Public Library of Rio de Janeiro. The 4 inscriptions above found in the abandoned City to be seen in the Public Library of Rio de Janeiro.

   EXCERPTS  FOR NON PROFITABLE USE,FROM THE BOOK  "The Hiding Place of  Kephises" (Cephissus)  – O Transplante do Terremoto-A destruicao de Kefises (The earthquake’s transplant and The destruction of Kefisus)
   Cephissus (Greek: Κηφισός, Kifisos) is a river flowing through the Athens agglomeration, Greece.
   The Bibliotheca (3.15.1) declares that Erechtheus' wife Praxithea was daughter of Phrasimus (otherwise unknown to us) by Diogenia (otherwise unknown to us) daughter of Cephissus.
   The source of the river is in the saddle between the Parnitha and Penteli mountains. From there it flows generally southwest until it reaches the Phaleron Bay between Neo Faliro and Moschato. Today the river flows near or under the Motorway 1 linking Athens and Thessaloniki for much of its length. This section of Motorway 1 is named Kifissou Avenue, and is home to the Kifissos Bus Terminal.
The Greek inscription copied in 1753
The “search for Atlantis”
The Persian Daric
The mysterious letter of ‘Z’
The idea of the “Z” letter in a map
   Was Colonel Fawcett’s great objective, the point of ‘Z’, a  Greek  ancient city built by a highly advanced civilization, inhabited by a human race of unbelievable beings, and located in the dense and still unexplored rainforest of the Brazilian’s wilderness?
   The mystery of Colonel Fawcett’s secret city of ‘Z’ emerges slowly from the past in an unbelievable theory concerning the destiny of this legendary British explorer in combination with his great objective to startle the world.
   A new testimony that reverts the originality of Colonel Fawcett’s story bringing the explorer’s great objective, the city of ‘Z’ in another dimension beginning from another country’s territory located far away from the Amazon’s jungle; a territory that, even if it is basically located at a distant to Brazil place of our planet that has offered so much to the archaeology of the world with its very rich background in the history of its civilization and we talk about Greece, it was and still is in search by famous explorers in a hidden location of the Amazon’s rainforest in the wilderness of the Brazilian Mato Grosso.
   According to our investigators, this territory that was included in the routing of Colonel Fawcett’s last ill-fated expedition in 1925 now emerges suddenly and slowly from the heart of the most recent investigations to bring to our world a new amazing and hard to believe story that combines the secrets found in the still unexplored parts of the Amazonian rainforest with a Greek ancient civilization before the Hellenistic times and even more back to the  Greek  mythology period that reveals the unpredictable theory of a Greek city named Cephissus as Colonel Fawcett’s great objective, a story that, if it comes alive, would certainly startle the world.

By Francisco Lago
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